TRIBAL JUSTICE

[tribal-justice--Film-list-image]
Judge Abby Abinanti and Taos Proctor (both Yurok) at the Yurok wellness celebration Photo by Anne Makepeace
87 minutes / Colour / 2017
Directed by
ANNE MAKEPEACE

Country of production United States

TRIBAL JUSTICE is a feature documentary about a little known, under-reported but effective criminal justice reform movement in America today: the efforts of tribal courts to create alternative justice systems based on their traditions. In California, the state with the largest number of Indian people and tribes, two formidable Native American women are among those leading the way. Abby Abinanti, Chief Judge of the Yurok Tribe on the northwest coast, and Claudette White, Chief Judge of the Quechan Tribe in the southeastern desert, are creating innovative systems that focus on restoring rather than punishing offenders in order to keep tribal members out of prison, prevent children from being taken from their communities, and stop the school-to-prison pipeline that plagues their young people.

Abby Abinanti is a fierce, lean, elder. Claudette White is younger, and her courtroom style is more conventional in form; but like Abby, her goal is to provide culturally relevant justice to the people who come before her. Observational footage of these judges' lives and work provides the backbone of the documentary, while the heart of the film follows offenders as their stories unfold over time, in and out of court, engaging viewers with the dedication of the judges, the humanity of the people who come before them, and a vision of justice that can actually work.

In the 2019 RAI Film Fest

Language and subtitles English and tribal languages

Location(s) depicted California, Tribal lands of the Yurok and Quechan people

Film web site